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WCLC09 | Integration of Tissue Biomarker Assays into Protocol and Nonprotocol Management of Lung Cancer – Proceedings from a CME Satellite Symposium Held During the 13th World Conference on Lung Cancer

ResearchToPractice.com/WCLC09 – Integration of Tissue Biomarker Assays into Protocol/Nonprotocol Mgmt of LC – Proceedings from a CME Satellite Symposium at the 13th World Conference on LC moderated by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 11 years ago
5
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VPB1_2010 | Case05

ResearchToPractice.com/VPB110 – A 54yo woman with bipolar disorder is diagnosed with a 1.6-cm, Grade III, strongly ER+, weakly PR+, HER2-, node- IDC and an Oncotype DX RS of 32. Interview conducted by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 11 years ago
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The Role of Structural Proteins in Normal and Abnormal Heart Development

A quick look at the role of 5 key structural proteins focusing on what happens when they are mutated. Includes recent research in this new and exciting field  
Jessica Gates
over 10 years ago
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Nigel Dempster - Life with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

An exclusive video made by Nigel Dempster, on life with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). PSP is a terminal degenerative brain disease which robs those affected of their ability to walk, talk, eat and see. The PSP Association provides help and support for those living with PSP, whilst funding research into the causes, treatments and eventual cure for the disease. www.pspeur.org  
MRCP Videos
almost 8 years ago
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Genetics and Epidemiology | Joslin Diabetes Center

Joslin Diabetes Center is the world’s foremost institution for diabetes research, clinical care and education. A useful site for up to date research on Diabetes  
joslin.org
over 7 years ago
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49

Asthma deaths report warns complacency is costing lives - BBC News

People with asthma are dying unnecessarily because of complacency among both medical staff and patients, a national study claims.  
BBC News
over 7 years ago
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Pediatric Cardiology-Tetralogy of Fallot-Peri-operative care

Pediatric Cardiology Teaching,lectures conducted by Dr Parvathi Iyer from Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi. The topic is - Tetralogy of...  
YouTube
over 7 years ago
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Pediatric Cardiology-Tetralogy of Fallot Current Management

Pediatric Cardiology Teaching,lectures conducted by Dr Krishna S Iyer from Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi. The topic is - Tetralogy o...  
YouTube
over 7 years ago
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Examination of the spine | Arthritis Research UK

Look initially from behind the patient for any obvious muscle wasting, asymmetry or scoliosis of the spine. Look from the side for normal: cervical lordosis thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis.  
arthritisresearchuk.org
about 7 years ago
6
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How to prepare a presentation?

What kind of things should be observed in preparing a lecture or presentation about my research work? What advice can you say about the lecture method? Thank you!  
Zoltán Cserháti
almost 9 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 xyj9qx?1444774087
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The NEW Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society

Who are we? This society has been formed by a core group of clinical year medical students at the University of Birmingham. We are hoping that lots more healthcare students at UoB will join us soon. This society is open to any student who has a keen interest in healthcare management – Nurse, physio, BMedSc, Medical student, Business student, dentist and pharmacist are all welcome. Why do we exist? Healthcare has become more complex. To ensure that patient’s receive the most effective treatments then healthcare services need to be organised effectively. This might be your role one day and you won’t receive any formal training in management theory or on team working and leadership skills from the University – knowledge that is essential to providing the best care for our patients. Studies have shown that clinicians who have received management training and who take an active role in managing the departments they belong to have achieved significantly decreased complication and mortality rates. What do we plan to do? 1) Raise awareness amongst healthcare students about the opportunities to be involved in healthcare management in their future careers. 2) The society hopes to act as an intermediary between healthcare students keen to make contacts with likeminded individuals in other course and years. We intend to have regular social events that allow everyone to practice their essential networking skills while at discussions over coffee, nights out, games of golf or away day visits to conferences and organisational visits. 3) The society will be holding lectures given by eminent professionals from all areas of healthcare management – The NHS, DoH, Armed forces, private organisations, think tanks, consultancy firms and leading researchers. 4) The society aims to help students foster essential leadership and team working skills that will be required in their future professional roles. These skills will be developed informally and during seminars and workshops. These skills will then be put to the test in high stress situations like Paintballing, laser tag and outdoor activities. 5) The final main aim of this society is to help students make contacts with clinicians and researchers who are working on improving healthcare systems and who need healthcare students to help with research. We hope to develop a network of contacts who are willing to provide research and audit opportunities to keen students. Are you interested in joining the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society? Then please email the committee at: med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com Or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ Or come find us at the MedSoc Freshers fair in September. The Student medical leadership society (SMiLeS) useful resources!!! Why is it important? student BMJ 2012;345:e5319 http://www.leadingsystemsnetwork.com/pdf/Management_Matters.pdf http://www.bmj.com/rapid-response/2011/11/02/improving-performance-nhs http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e5015 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=healthcare+reform Undergrad oppurtunities http://www.diagnosisltd.co.uk/ http://www.ihi.org/offerings/ihiopenschool/Pages/default.aspx http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/business-school/programmes/msc-health-management?gclid=CPTQy6bCwLgCFS3HtAodZ1sAtQ http://medicalleadership.net/committee/ http://www.lead-in.co.uk/ http://www.ihi.org/offerings/IHIOpenSchool/Chapters/Pages/SQLA.aspx Foundation year opportunities http://www.stfs.org.uk/faculty/leadership Future career opportunities http://www.leadership.londondeanery.ac.uk/home/fellowships%20in%20clinical%20education http://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/get-involved/harkness-fellowship Higher Education http://www.surrey.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/business/healthcaremanagement/ http://www.open.ac.uk/health-and-social-care/main/study-us/leadership http://www.manchester.ac.uk/postgraduate/taughtdegrees/courses/atoz/course/?code=05855 http://www.brunel.ac.uk/bbs/mba/mba-specialisations/healthcare-management http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/courses/postgraduate/taught/social-policy/health-care-policy-management.aspx http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/social-policy/departments/health-services-management-centre/index.aspx Free Learning/ Relevant organisations http://www.qficonsulting.com/healthcare/qfi-healthcare http://www.tocthinkers.com/ http://www.tocthinkers.com/2012/05/qa-performance-improvement-for-healthcare-leading-change-with-lean-six-sigma-and-constraints-managem.html http://www.institute.nhs.uk/quality_and_service_improvement_tools/quality_and_service_improvement_tools/theory_of_constraints.html http://www.dbrmfg.co.nz https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=theory+of+constraints&rlz=1C1CHMC_enGB501GB502&oq=Theory+of+con&aqs=chrome.0.0j69i57j5j69i65j0j69i62.4977j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_constraints http://www.york.ac.uk/che/ http://www.ihm.org.uk/ Relevant Journals http://www.bmj.com/highwire/filestream/342359/field_highwire_article_pdf/0/bmj.c5072.full.pdf www.civitas.org.uk/doctors/index.php http://www.bmj.com/highwire/filestream/342359/field_highwire_article_pdf/0/bmj.c5072.full.pdf http://www.hsj.co.uk/# http://www.bjhcm.co.uk/ book list http://www.amazon.co.uk/Performance-Improvement-Healthcare-Constraints-ebook/dp/B005RWFOSE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1374945477&sr=8-1&keywords=Performance+Improvement+for+Healthcare http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_6?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=goldratt&sprefix=Goldra%2Cdigital-text%2C142&rh=i%3Adigital-text%2Ck%3Agoldratt Final Summary Did you know that you may not just work for the NHS, but also help to run it? The new Medical Leadership Society aims to foster leadership skills in healthcare students through talks from NHS leaders, the DoH and even the Armed Forces. We provide a way for you to learn about being a leader and influencing policies in the NHS, and our talks and events will serve as an excellent platform for you to start making influential contacts within areas that interest you. You’ll also practice those leadership skills in an array of activities, including paintballing and laser tag!  
jacob matthews
over 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 xta4hx?1444774129
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Cardiff University Research Society (CUReS) Annual Event

The Cardiff University Research Society (CUReS) held its second annual student research symposium on the 13th of November 2013 at the University Hospital of Wales. Medical students were invited to submit posters and oral presentations for the symposium. The event also launched this year’s INSPIRE program, a joint effort between Cardiff, Bristol, Exeter and Plymouth to give students connections to research groups through taster days and summer research programs. CUReS is a research society for medical students in Cardiff. All events and projects are completely free and available to all years. The research society has a particular focus on developing close bonds between researchers and students. In addition to INSPIRE, the society also releases a yearly list of summer research projects where medical students can find researchers interested in hosting projects over the summer. The purpose of the conference was to mark the launch of the INSPIRE taster days and display some of the impressive work that has been accomplished from the taster sessions and the funded summer projects. The symposium aims to give Cardiff medical students valuable experience in presenting their research and to motivate students interested in pursuing an academic career. CUReS president Huw Davies gave the opening speech, while INSPIRE lead Colin Dayan introduced the INSPIRE program. Previous INSPIRE students gave talks on their research and experiences gained from the program. Three successful applicants were invited to give oral presentations that were judged by the Cardiff Dean of Medicine Professor Paul Morgan, Professor Colin Dayan and Professor Julian Sampson, who also gave the keynote speech on his research. The symposium was a great success thanks to the enthusiastic medical students who presented posters and gave oral presentations on their research. First prize for an oral presentation was awarded to Georgiana Samoila for her work on Histological Diagnosis of Lung and Pleural Malignancies, while Lisa Roberts and Jason Chai were awarded runner-ups. The award for best poster was given to Thomas Lemon. Two further awards sponsored by Meducation, assessed by Peter Winter, were given to George Kimpton and Ryan Preece for their poster presentations. There was also a Meducation stall and the Cardiff University Research Society greatly appreciates the support. To get in touch with the CUReS, please email cures@cardiff.ac.uk or visit our website at www.cu-res.co.uk for more information. Written by Robert Lundin  
Nicole Chalmers
about 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 gvoh9v?1444774222
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Socks, Kiwis and Surgical Removal

I’m a klutz. Always have been. Probably always will be. I blame my clumsiness on the fact that I didn’t crawl. Apparently I was sitting around one day and toddling on two feet the next. Whatever the cause, it’s a well-tested fact that I’m not good on icy footpaths. Various parts of my anatomy have gotten up close and personal with frozen ground on many an occasion. Not usually an issue for a born-and-bred Australian, except when said Australian goes to visit her Canadian family during the northern winter. During one such visit, I found myself unceremoniously plopped onto slick ice while my two-year-old niece frolicked around me with sure-footed abandon. I thought, “There has to be an easier way.” As freezing water seeped through my jeans, providing a useful cold pack for my screaming coccyx, my memory was jogged. I recalled that a lateral-thinking group of New Zealand researchers had won the Ignoble Prize for Physics for demonstrating that wearing socks on the outsides of shoes reduces the incidence of falls on icy footpaths. To the amusement of my niece, I tried out the theory for myself on the walk home. I don’t know if I had a more secure foothold or not, but I did manage to get blisters from wearing sneakers without socks. I love socks. They cover my large, ungainly clod-hoppers and keep my toes toasty warm almost all year round. You know the song ‘You can leave your hat on.’? Well for me, it is more a case of ‘You can leave your socks on, especially in winter. There’s nothing unromantic about that… is there? I’m not, however, as attached to my socks as a patient I once treated. As an intern doing a psychiatry rotation, one of my tasks was to do physical examinations on all admissions. Being a dot-the-i’s kinda girl, when an old homeless man declined to remove his socks so that I could examine his feet, I didn’t let it slide. “I haven’t taken off my socks for thirty years,” he pronounced. “It can’t be that long. Your socks aren’t thirty years old. In fact, they look quite new,” I countered. “When the old ones wear out, I just slip a new pair over the top.” I didn’t believe him. From his odour, I would have believed that he hadn’t showered in thirty years, but the sock story didn’t add up. He eventually agreed to let me take them off. The top two sock layers weren’t a problem but then I ran into trouble. Black remains of what used to be socks clung firmly to his feet, and my gentle attempts at their removal resulted in screams of agony. I tried soaking his feet. Still no luck. His skin had grown up into the fibres, and it was impossible to extract the old sock remnants without ripping off skin. In retrospect I probably should have left the old man alone, but instead got the psych registrar to have a peek, who then involved the emergency registrar, who called the surgeon and soon enough the patient and his socks were off to theatre. The ‘surgical removal of socks’ was not a commonly performed procedure, and it provided much staff amusement. It wasn’t so funny for Mr. Sock Man, who required several skin grafts! From my perspective here in Canada, while I thoroughly commend the Kiwis for their ground-breaking sock research, I think I’ll stick to the more traditional socks-in-shoes approach, change my socks regularly and work a bit on my coordination skills. References: PHYSICS PRIZE: Lianne Parkin, Sheila Williams, and Patricia Priest of the University of Otago, New Zealand, for demonstrating that, on icy footpaths in wintertime, people slip and fall less often if they wear socks on the outside of their shoes. "Preventing Winter Falls: A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Novel Intervention," Lianne Parkin, Sheila Williams, and Patricia Priest, New Zealand Medical Journal. vol. 122, no, 1298, July 3, 2009, pp. 31-8. (This blog post has been adapted from a column first published in Australian Doctor http://www.australiandoctor.com.au/articles/58/0c06f058.asp) Dr Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com/  
Dr Genevieve Yates
almost 8 years ago
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A Modest Man

The registrar's face was taking on a testy look. So enduring was the silence our furtive glances had developed a nystagmic quality. “Galactosaemia” came her peremptory reply. Right on queue the disjointed chorus of ahs and head nods did little to hide our mental whiteboard of differentials being wiped clean. At the time conjugated bilirubinaemia in children only meant one thing: biliary atresia. A fair assumption; we were sitting in one of three specialist centres in the country equipped to treat these patients. Ironically the condition has become the unwieldy yardstick I now measure the incidence of paediatric disease. Biliary atresia is the most common surgical cause of neonatal jaundice with a reported incidence of 1 in 14-16ooo live births in the West. It is described as a progressive inflammatory obliteration of the extrahapatic bile duct. And Dr Charles West, the founder of Great Ormond Street Hospital, offers an eloquent description of the presenting triad of prolonged jaundice, pale acholic stools and dark yellow urine: ‘Case 18...It was born at full term, though small, apparently healthy. At 3 days however, it began to get yellow and at the end of 3 weeks was very yellow. Her motions at no time after the second day appeared natural on examination, but were white, like cream, and her urine was very high coloured.’ 1855 was the year of Dr West's hospital note. An almost universally fatal diagnosis and it would remain so for the next 100 years. The time's primordial classification of biliary atresia afforded children with the 'noncorrectable' type, a complete absence of patent extrahepatic bile duct, an unfortunate label; they were beyond saving. Having discovered the extent of disease at laparatomy, the surgeons would normally close the wound. The venerable Harvardian surgeon, Robert E. Gross saved an enigmatic observation: “In most instances death followed a downhill course…” K-A-S-A-I read the ward’s board. It was scrawled under half the children's names. I dismissed it as just another devilishly hard acronym to forget. The thought of an eponymous procedure had escaped me and in biliary atresia circles, it's the name everyone should know: Dr Morio Kasai. Originating from Aomori prefecture, Honshu, Japan, Dr Kasai graduated from the National Tohoku University School of Medicine in 1947. His ascension was rapid, having joined the 2nd department of Surgery as a general surgeon, he would assume the role of Assistant Professor in 1953. The department, under the tenure of Professor Shigetsugu Katsura, shared a healthy interest in research. 1955 was the landmark year. Katsura and Kasai operated on their first case: a 72 day old infant. Due to bleeding at the incised porta hepatis, Katsura is said to have 'placed' the duodenum over the site in order to staunch the flow. She made a spectacular postoperative recovery, the jaundice had faded and there was bile pigment in her stool. During the second case, Katsura elected to join the unopened duodenum to the porta hepatis. Sadly the patient's jaundice did not recover, but the post-mortem conducted by Kasai confirmed the development of a spontaneous internal biliary fistula connecting the internal hepatic ducts to the duodenum. Histological inspection of removed extrahepatic duct showed the existence of microscopic biliary channels, hundreds of microns in diameter. Kasai made a pivotal assertion: the transection of the fibrous cord of the obliterated duct must contain these channels before anastomosis with the jejunal limb Roux-en-Y loop. This would ensure communication between the porta hepatis and the intrahepatic biliary system. The operation, entitled hepatic portoenterostomy, was first performed as a planned procedure for the third case at Tohoku. Bile flow was restored and Kasai published the details of the new technique in the Japanese journal Shujutsu in 1959. However, news of this development did not dawn on the West until 1968 in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. The success of the operation and its refined iterations were eventually recognized and adopted in the 1970s. The operation was and is not without its dangers. Cholangitis, portal hypertension, malnutrition and hepatopulmonary syndrome are the cardinal complications. While diagnosing and operating early (<8 weeks) are essential to the outcome, antibiotic prophylaxis and nutritional support are invaluable prognostic factors. Post operatively, the early clearance of jaundice (within 3 months) and absence of liver cirrhosis on biopsy, are promising signs. At UK centres the survival after a successful procedure is 80%. The concurrent development of liver transplantation boosts this percentage to 90%. Among children, biliary atresia is the commonest indication for transplantation; by five years post-Kasai, 45% will have undergone the procedure. On the 6th December 2008, Dr Kasai passed away. He was 86 years old and had been battling the complications of a stroke he suffered in 1999. His contemporaries and disciples paint a humble and colourful character. A keen skier and mountaineer, Dr Kasai lead the Tohoku University mountain-climbing team to the top of the Nyainquntanglha Mountains, the highest peaks of the Tibetan highlands. It was the first successful expedition of its kind in the world. He carried through this pioneering spirit into his professional life. Paediatric surgery was not a recognized specialty in Japan. By founding and chairing multiple associations including the Japanese Society of Pediatric Surgeons, Dr Kasai gave his specialty and biliary atresia, the attention it deserved. Despite numerous accolades of international acclaim for his contributions to paediatric surgery, Dr Kasai insisted his department refer to his operation as the hepatic portoenterostomy; the rest of the world paid its originator the respect of calling it the ‘Kasia’. Upon completion of their training, he would give each of his surgeons a hand-written form of the word ‘Soshin’ [simple mind], as he believed a modest surgeon was a good one. At 5 foot 2, Kasai cut a more diminutive figure one might expect for an Emeritus Professor and Hospital Director of a university hospital. During the course of his lifetime he had developed the procedure and lived to see its fruition. The Kasia remains the gold standard treatment for biliary atresia; it has been the shinning light for what Willis J. Potts called the darkest chapter in paediatric surgery. It earned Dr Kasai an affectionate but apt name among his peers, the small giant. References Miyano T. Morio Kasai, MD, 1922–2008. Pediatr Surg Int. 2009;25(4):307–308. Garcia A V, Cowles RA, Kato T, Hardy MA. Morio Kasai: a remarkable impact beyond the Kasai procedure. J Pediatr Surg. 2012;47(5):1023–1027. Mowat AP. Biliary atresia into the 21st century: A historical perspective. Hepatology. 1996;23(6):1693–1695. Ohi R. A history of the Kasai operation: Hepatic portoenterostomy for biliary atresia. World J Surg. 1988;12(6):871–874. Ohi R. Morio Kasai, MD 1922-2008. J Pediatr Surg. 2009;44(3):481–482. Lewis N, Millar A. Biliary atresia. Surg. 2007;25(7):291–294. This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the Medical Student Newspaper, April 2014 issue.  
James Wong
over 7 years ago
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Which Fields of Medicine do Phamarcogenomics Hold The Greatest Promise for?

Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogentics testing are nothing new, but the recent breakthroughs and lowered costs assosciated with genetic sequencing mean these breakthroughs are now more accessible than ever. Which fields of medicine do you think stand to benefit the most. Cancer research and psychiatry come to mind, but what other fields of medicine could this technology help as well?  
Pharmaco Genetics
over 6 years ago