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74

Teaching public health in medical schools: a case study in three universities in Paraná - Brazil

Historically, different concepts of Public Health have influenced the specific teaching of this field of knowledge as well as medical education. The objective of this paper is to study the teaching of Public Health in medical schools, focusing on its structure and implications in curriculum design in three universities in Paraná - Brazil: State University of Londrina (UEL), Federal University of Paraná (UFPR) and the Positivo University (UnicenP). The research questions focused on the content of Public Health selected in their respective curricula, the teaching-learning relationships, program emphasis and the partnerships established with public health services. Qualitative research data collection from the perspective of key informants was carried out based on the analysis of pedagogical projects and on how they were effectively experienced. Eleven managers and 18 teachers were interviewed and 4 focus groups with students were developed in the three universities. Outcomes showed the presence of between 5% to 20% of Public Health themes in the course syllabi, depending on the teaching strategies used. However, they always appeared associated with academic issues strongly linked to health services, which were strengthened by the local development of the Comprehensive Health Care System in the two cities, Curitiba and Londrina in which studies were carried out. Public Health is present and very relevant in the curriculum required for doctors’ qualification regardless of the characteristics of the university studied, the bureaucratic and academic course structures and the different methods for hiring teachers. Besides not being a main articulator axis in two of the medical courses studied, Public Health provides the necessary balance for the technical dimension of medical knowledge, represented by the awareness of the challenges and commitment to the reality. On the contrary, because of the complexity of medical education, the strong presence of Public Health in the other medical course studied not necessarily guarantees the ideal qualification of the medical professional.  
João Campos
about 12 years ago
0
3
94

Identifying and Treating All Aspects of Fibromyalgia: A New Look Into a Painful Syndrome - Pain, Depression and Sleep

In this podcast, Drs. Andrew Cutler and Stephen M. Stahl discuss the myriad comorbidities associated with the syndrome of fibromyalgia. Patients often present complaining of fatigue as well as pain. Recent research suggests a link between pain, depression and sleep, which is discussed in this podcast.  
Neuroscience Education Institute
over 11 years ago
1
3
31

BCUTT2 2007 | Treatment of HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

BreastCancerUpdate.com/ThinkTank – Proceedings from a Clinical Investigator “Think Tank.” Treatment of HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer. Interviews conducted by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 11 years ago
Preview
3
44

Confidentiality Guidelines : Caldicott Report: key principles

Every proposed use or transfer of patient identifiable information within or from an organisation should be clearly defined and scrutinised. With continuing uses regularly reviewed, by an appropriate guardian.  
confidential.oxfordradcliffe.net
about 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 8w50wb?1444773929
3
153

University of Debrecen and the Possibilities of Social Media

I'm student of University of Debrecen - one of Hungary’s five research-elite universities. It offers the widest choice of majors in the country for over 32,000 students. It has 1500 lecturers of 15 faculties endeavour to live up to the elite university status and to provide high quality education for those choosing the University of Debrecen every day. The University of Debrecen is a dynamically expanding institution. I believe in power of social media and I'm so glad my University has embraced it too. It has an official Facebook page where they post newest education or sport news (they have 18.863 followers, which is not too bad). For the fastest information you can follow their Twitter page. If you like videos or simply you missed some events, you can catch up on their official Youtube channel. In other universities (e.g. Cardiff University) these tools are evident, but, unfortunately not all universities in Hungary understand the value of them. The University of Debrecen tries to keep up with revolution of social media. Encourage your university to do the same!  
Zoltán Cserháti
almost 9 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1i9rgu8?1444773940
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226

The elephant in the room: Is everything you see on an x-ray relevant?

Recent 'tongue in cheek' research which has been reported in a Washington Post blog recently has caused a lot of questions to be raised concerning inattention blindness, which could cause concern unless you understand the underlying psychology. Here's a CT scan: During psychology lectures at Med School, you may have encountered the basketball bouncing students in front of a bank of elevators where you were asked to count the number of passes the basketball made from the player wearing the white T shirt, while a gorilla ran between the students. (Even if you did watch it before, you can re-watch the video on the Washington Post blog). The recent study asked radiologists to identify and count how many nodules are present in the lungs on a regular CT thorax. If you look at the image you may see a gorilla waving his arms about. As a radiologist, I see the anatomy in the background, the chambers of the heart and mediastinum, but nothing there out of the ordinary. As radiologists, we are looking for pathology, but also report pathological findings that are unexpected. The clinical history of a patient is very important for us in interpretation of imaging examinations, as we need to answer the question you are asking, but have to be careful we do not miss anything else of serious import. As we do not see any other pathology, we would not expect to find a gorilla in the chest, so our brains can pass over distracting findings. The other psychological issue is the satisfaction of search, where we can see the expected pathology, but may miss the other cancer if we do not carefully and systematically look through the images. So the main thing to learn from this is that your training should always keep you alert, not just to expected happening, but to not discount the unexpected, then many lives will be saved as a result of your attention to detail.  
Chris Flowers
almost 9 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 riytde?1444773947
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99

Reflection

Just as a bit of an intro, my name is Conrad Hayes, I'm a 4th year medical student studying in Staffordshire. My medical school are quite big on getting us into the habit of writing down reflections. It's something I feel I do subconsciously whilst I'm with patients or in teaching sessions, but frankly I suck at the written bit and I feel on the whole it's probably because there's nobody discussing this with us or telling me I'm an idiot for some of the things I may think/say! So I think if I'm going to attempt to complete a blog then I am going to do it in a reflective style and I do look forward to peoples feedback and discussions. I'll try to do it daily and see if that works out well, or weekly. But hopefully even if it doesn't get much response it can just be a store for me to look back on things! (Providing I keep up with it). So I'll start now, with a short reflection on my career aspirations which have been pretty much firmed up, but today I gave a presentation that I felt really galvanised me into this. So I want to do Emergency Medicine and Expedition Medicine (on the side more than as my main job). Emergency Medicine appeals to me as I love primary care and being the first to see patients, but I want to see them when they're ill and have a role in the puzzle solving, as it were, that is their issues. Possibly more to the point I want to do this in a high pressure environment where acutely ill individuals come in, and I feel (having done placements in A&E and GP and AMU) A&E is the place for me to be. Expedition Medicine on the other hand is something I accidentally stumbled upon really. In 2nd year I was part of a podcast group MedHeads that we tried to set up at my medical school. I interviewed Dr Amy Hughes of Expedition & Wilderness Medicine, a UK company, and I got really excited about the concepts she was talking about. Practicing medicine in the middle of nowhere, limited resources and sometimes only personal accumen and ingenuity to help you through. It sounded perfect! And since then I've wanted to do it, particularly being interested in Mountain Medicine and getting involved with some research groups. Today in front of my group I gave a presentation on the effects of altitude on the brain (I'm on Neurology at the moment and we had to pick a topic that interested us). I spoke for 15 minutes, a concept that usually terrifies me truth be told, and I thoroughly enjoyed myself. Now I've given a fair number of presentations but this was the first time I was actively excited and really happy about talking! It seems to me that if that isn't the definition of why you should go for a job, then I need to talk to a careers advisor. This experience has definitely ensured I pursue this course with every resource I have available to me! I would be interested in hearing how other people feel about their careers panning out and what got them into it so feel free to leave a comment!!  
Conrad Hayes
almost 9 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 fkplre?1444774007
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1554

Pathological Priorities

Previously I blogged about the 'stigma' and discrimination often faced by those confronting mental illness - even by colleagues. It was incredibly apt, therefore, that just a week later, the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCPsych) published their "Parity" report. The report entitled Whole Person Care: from rhetoric to reality calls for an equality in physical vs mental health. As with many of my colleagues, I saw the word "Whole Person Care" and was instantly guilty of a pre-formed stereotype. I don't like the term whole person care nor holistic medicine. I hear these terms and my thoughts instantly switch to bright colours, 60s attire and I start humming "this is the dawning of the age of Aquarius". More so, this topic becomes riddled with questionable pseuodoscience and tentative nods to evidence-less forms of complimentary medicine. I think such terms are perhaps self destructive and instantly mark out mental health as odd. Ambiguous terms such as this make the whole topic even more off putting. Holistic rants aside, this report is an exceptionally important read (or at least glance) for all future doctors. There is an unquestionable inequality in mental and physical health in this country. It seems that if we can't 'see' something, it's not quantifiable and therefore loses a position of importance. It leads us to have 'pathological priorities', putting the physical before the mental. Despite this, both influence one another and deserve equal importance. Some of the key points of the report are: A call for equal funding of Mental and Physical Health Services A call to reduce discrimination and stigmas associated with Mental Health A call for equal care and treatment of Mental health/Physical Health A call for management and leaders (such as commissioning boards)to acknowledge the equality of mental/physical health Perhaps the most important for myself as I read through this was a call for equal access to Mental Health treatments under NICE clinical guidelines. Currently, patients have the right to receive only mental health treatments which have undergone NICE technology appraisals - not those offered by clinical guidelines. For example, NICE Clinical Guidelines state talk therapies are more effective than instant antidepressants for treatment of mild depression. The report is a huge step toward equality in mental and physical health. Perhaps we should all just take a moment to address the importance of both. You can read the full report and a summary on the RCPsych website here: http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/usefulresources/publications/collegereports/op/op88.aspx  
Lucas Brammar
over 8 years ago
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2124

Five top tips on why healthcare professionals should be using social media in 2014

The relationship between patients and doctors has long been based on face-to-face communication and complete confidentiality. Whilst these fundamentals still absolutely remain, the channels of communication across all sectors have changed monumentally, with social media at the forefront of these changes. Increasingly patients are taking to the Internet to find recommendations for healthcare professionals and to self-diagnose. By having an online presence your business can positively influence these conversations – engaging with the public and colleagues both locally and globally and can facilitate public access to accurate health information. The reality is social media is here to stay, so in 2014 why not make it your resolution to become part of the conversation. To get you started and so that social media isn’t seen as such a daunting place, SocialB are providing a free eBook containing lots of fantastic advice on how to use social media within the healthcare sector ‘Twitter for Healthcare Professionals’ please visit http://www.socialmedia-trainingcourses.com/top-10-twitter-tips-ebook/ to receive your free copy. Here are 5 top tips on using social media in 2014: 1. Decide on your online image and adhere to it Decide how you would like to be portrayed professionally and apply this to your online presence. Create a tone of voice and a company image – in line with your branding and values – and stick to it. 2. Be approachable, whilst maintain professional boundaries Connecting with patients via social media can help to ease their concerns and develop a certain rapport or trust with you prior to their consultation. However, this must remain professional at all times, and individual advice should not be given. The general rule is that personal ‘friend requests’ should not be accepted; connection over corporate pages and accounts is encouraged to maintain a traditional doctor-patient relationship. 3. Contribute your knowledge, experience and industry information Social media is a fantastic way to launch an online marketing campaign. Interaction with your patients and potential clients via social networks is an inexpensive way to engage with, and learn from your audience. As a healthcare professional, you will inevitably take part in conferences, training days and possibly new research. Social media allows you to share your knowledge, enabling your market to be better informed about you and your work. 4. Treat others how you wish to be treated By engaging with other means that they are more likely to take notice of, and share, your social media updates. Sharing is key and it is this action that will substantially grow your audiences. Maintain your professionalism and pre-agreed tone of voice whilst communicating with others. Make it easy for peers and patients to recommend your level of skill and service, and ensure you recommend fellow healthcare professionals for the same reasons. 5. Consider your audience Whilst you may be astute at targeting a particular audience as a result of careful market research, always be aware who else can see your online presence. Governing bodies, competitors and the press are just a few examples. Whilst social media tends to be a more informal platform, by following the above points will ensure your professional reputation is upheld. Thank you Katy Sutherland at SocialB for providing this blog post.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1njk26?1444774138
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141

Doctor or a scientist?

"One special advantage of the skeptical attitude of mind is that a man is never vexed to find that after all he has been in the wrong" Sir William Osler Well, it's almost Christmas. I know it's Christmas because the animal skeleton situated in the reception of my University's Anatomy School has finally been re-united with his (or her?) Christmas hat, has baubles for eyes and tinsel on its ribcage. This doesn't help with my trying to identify it (oh the irony if it is indeed a reindeer). This term has probably been one of the toughest academic terms I've had, but then when you intercalate that is sort of what you choose to let yourself in for. I used to think that regular readings were a chore in the pre-clinical years. I had ample amounts of ethics, sociology and epidemiology readings to do but this is nothing compared to the world of scientific papers. The first paper I had to read this term related to Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) integrity in articular cartilage and its possible role in the pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis. Well, I know that now. When I first started reading it felt very much like a game of boggle and highly reminiscent of high school spanish lessons where I just sat and nodded my head. This wasn't the end. Every seminar has come with its own prescribed reading list. The typical dose is around 4-5 papers. This got me thinking. We don't really spend all that much time understanding how to read scientific papers nor do we really explore our roles as 'scientists' as well as future clinicians. Training programmes inevitably seem to create false divides between the 'clinicans' and the 'academics' and sometimes this has negative consequences - one simply criticises the other: Doctors don't know enough about science, academics are out of touch with the real world etc... Doctors as scientists... The origins of medicine itself lie with some of the greatest scientists of all time - Herophilus, Galen, Da Vinci, William Harvey (the list is endless). As well as being physicians, all of these people were also respected scientists who regularly made contributions to our understanding of the body's mechanics. Albeit, the concept of ethics was somewhat thrown to the wind (Herophilus, though dead for thousands of years, is regularly accused of performing vivisections on prisoners in his discovery of the duodenum). Original sketches by William Harvey which proved a continuous circuit of blood being supplied and leaving the upper limb. He used his observations to explain the circulatory system as we know it today What was unique about these people? The ability to challenge what they saw. They made observations, tested them against their own knowledge and asked more questions - they wanted to know more. As well as being doctors, we have the unique opportunity to make observations and question what we see. What's causing x to turn into y? What trends do we see in patients presenting with x? The most simple question can lead to the biggest shift in understanding. It only took Semmelweiss to ask why women were dying in a maternity ward to give rise to our concept of modern infection control. Bad Science... Anyone who has read the ranting tweets, ranting books and ranting YouTube TED videos of academic/GP Ben Goldacre will be familiar with this somewhat over used term. Pseudoscience (coined by the late great Karl Popper) is a much more sensible and meaningful term. Science is about gathering evidence which supports your hypothesis. Pseudoscience is a field which makes claims that cannot be tested by a study. In truth, there's lots and lots of relatively useless information in print. It's fine knowing about biomarker/receptor/cytokine/antibody/gene/transcription factor (insert meaningless acronym here) but how is it relevant and how does it fit into the bigger picture? Science has become reductionist. We're at the gene level and new reducing levels of study (pharmacogenetics) break this down even further and sometimes, this is at an expense of providing anything useful to your clinicial toolbox. Increasing job competition and post-graduate 'scoring' systems has also meant there's lots of rushed research in order to get publications and citations. This runs the danger of further undermining the doctors role as a true contributor to science. Most of it is wrong... I read an article recently that told me at least 50% of what I learn in medical school will be proven wrong in my lifetime. That might seem disheartening since I may have pointlessly consumed ample coffee to revise erroneous material. However, it's also exciting. What if you prove it wrong? What if you contributed to changing our understanding? As a doctor, there's no reason why you can't. If we're going to practice evidence-based medicine then we need to understand that evidence and doing this requires us to wear our scientist hat. It would be nice to see a whole generation of doctors not just willing to accept our understanding but to challenge that which is tentative. That's what science is all about. Here's hoping you don't find any meta-analyses in your stockings. Merry Christmas.  
Lucas Brammar
almost 8 years ago
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3
27

Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology Resource

Cambridge University Press is part of the University of Cambridge. It furthers the University’s mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning, and research at the highest international levels of excellence.  
stahlonline.cambridge.org
over 6 years ago
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3
834

10 Important Differences Between Brains and Computers

Although the brain-computer metaphor has served cognitive psychology well, research in cognitive neuroscience has revealed many important differences between brains and computers. Appreciating these differences may be crucial to understanding the mechanisms of neural information processing, and ultimately for the creation of artificial intelligence. Below, I review the most important of these differences (and the consequences to cognitive psychology of failing to recognize them): similar ground is covered in this excellent (though lengthy) lecture.  
scienceblogs.com
almost 6 years ago
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3
31

The Leadership Council - The Effect of Childhood Trauma on Brain Development

As recently as the 1980s, many professionals thought that by the time babies are born, the structure of their brains was already genetically determined. However, emerging research shows evidence of altered brain functioning as a result of early abuse and neglect. The key to why this occurs appears to be in the brain.  
leadershipcouncil.org
over 5 years ago
Preview 300x412
2
452

Innovative Programme Elements Add Value to a FAIMER Regional Institute Faculty Development Fellowship Model in Southern Africa

The Foundation for the Advancement of Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) is a US-based non-profit organisation committed to improving health professions education to improve global health. FAIMER traditionally offers a two year fellowship programme; 2 residential and 3 distance learning sessions and an education innovation project in the fellow’s home institution. The focus is on education methods, leadership/management, scholarship and the development of an international community of health professions educators. During the past 5 years, FAIMER has expanded the programme and established regional institutes in India[3], Brazil[1] and Southern Africa (SAFRI)[1]. We implemented the programme in Africa in 2008, introducing 5 innovations to the generic programme. SAFRI was created as an independent voluntary association to reflect the multinational intent of the programme. Aim of project To understand the impact of the innovations in the structure and implementation of the programme on its quality and the experience of the participants in it. Conclusions Faculty development programmes can significantly enhance their impact: Be sensitive to the local political climate Demonstrate wide ownership Focus on developing a community of practice Work within the professional time constraints of Fellows and faculty Maximise learning opportunities by linking to other scholarly activities  
Juanita Bezuidenhout
about 12 years ago
0
2
62

Lecture: New directions in the psychology of chronic pain management - Dr Lance McCracken

<span style="font-style: italic;">Listen again</span>:<br />Download <a href="http://www.archive.org/download/NewDirectionsInThePsychologyOfChronicPainManagement-DrLanceMccracken/Wspg-dec-2007-lanceMccracken_64kb.mp3">mp3 of lecture</a> 34.4Mb Duration: 1:11:35<br />Listen to <a href="http://www.archive.org/download/NewDirectionsInThePsychologyOfChronicPainManagement-DrLanceMccracken/NewDirectionsInThePsychologyOfChronicPainManagement-DrLanceMccracken_64kb.m3u"> lo-fi stream</a><br /><br /><span style="font-style: italic;">Further reading:<br /></span>DAHL, J., &amp; LUNDGREN, T. (2006). <i>Living beyond your pain using acceptance and commitment therapy to ease chronic pain. </i>Oakland, CA, New Harbinger Publications.<br /><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/63472470&amp;tab=details">http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/63472470</a><br /><br />HAYES, S. C., STROSAHL, K., &amp; WILSON, K. G. (1999). <i>Acceptance and commitment therapy an experiential approach to behavior change. </i>New York, Guilford Press.<br /><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/41712470&amp;tab=details">http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/41712470</a><br /><br />MCCRACKEN, L. M. (2005). <i>Contextual cognitive-behavioral therapy for chronic pain. </i>Progress in pain research and management, v. 33. Seattle, IASP Press.<br /><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/57564664&amp;tab=details">http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/57564664</a><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/13562045-6816145727901784888?l=wspain.blogspot.com' alt='' /></div>  
West of Scotland Pain Group lectures
over 11 years ago
12
2
26

Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer 2008 | Interview with Eleftherios P Mamounas, MD, MPH

ResearchToPractice.com/NSABP_2008 – Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer: Proceedings from a Collaborative Education Session Held in Conjunction with the 50th Anniversary of the NSABP, moderated by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 11 years ago
5
2
15

BCUTT2 2007 | Treatment Considerations for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

BreastCancerUpdate.com/ThinkTank – Proceedings from a Clinical Investigator “Think Tank.” Treatment Considerations for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer. Interviews conducted by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 11 years ago
7
2
28

HCCU1 2007 | 51yo undiagnosed hep B w/bilobar mod diff HCC in noncirrhotic liver

HCCUpdate.com – 51yo, previously undiagnosed hep B, w/bilobar, mod diff HCC in noncirrhotic liver. Interviews conducted by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 11 years ago
4
2
27

HOUJC1 2009 | Case 5

ResearchToPractice.com/HOUJC109 – Case 5: 53yo woman with symptomatic, high-risk mantle-cell lymphoma treated with R-hyper-CVAD. Interviews conducted by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 11 years ago