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1
88

Pharmacokinetics 4 - Metabolism

http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial is the fourth in the Pharmacokinetics series. This tutorial discusses how drugs are metabolised by Cytoch...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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2
53

Bilirubin 2 - Bilirubin Metabolism & Diseases

http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial is the second of the Bilirubin series. It explains the process of Bilirubin Metabolism in the liver. This...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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23

How Lipoproteins Affect Metabolism in Diabetes

There is a strong connection between type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. This animation describes the lipid abnormalities commonly seen in patients with type 2...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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2
97

Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System

This animation focuses on the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), a classic endocrine system that helps to regulate long-term blood pressure and ext...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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1
101

PHARMACOKINETICS; Absorption & Distribution of Drugs by Professor Fink

In this Video Lecture on Pharmacokinetics, Professor Fink describes the Absorption & Distribution of Drugs. The major factors affecting the systemic absorpti...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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1
23

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Metabolism and Toxicity

This is the best online medical lectures site, providing high quality medical and nursing lectures for students across the globe. Our lectures are oversimpli...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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114

Table of Contents - Online Textbook of Bacteriology

Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology chapters on bacteriology, microbes in the environment, cycles of elements, bacterial structure, bacterial nutrition, bacterial growth, bacterial metabolism, bacteria and archaea, normal flora, bacterial pathogens, bacterial toxins, endotoxin, antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, staphylococci and MRSA, streptococcus, pneumonia, anthrax, E. coli, cholera, Salmonella, Pseudomonas, Shigella, gonorrhea, meningococcal meningitis, botulism and tetanus hib meningitis, Listeria, whooping cough, B. cereus food poisoning, tuberculosis, diphtheria, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, Vibrio vulnificus, Bacillus, lactic acid bacteria.  
textbookofbacteriology.net
about 7 years ago
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139

Pharmacokinetics for Students: Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Elimination -Lect 1

PK or pharmacokinetics, what is it? The four things will discuss are four components of PK Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Elimination (ADME). Lear...  
YouTube
about 7 years ago
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30

Metabolism - Beta-Oxidation

 
nutrition.jbpub.com
about 7 years ago
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38

Starch (Carbohydrate) Digestion and Absorption

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twit...  
YouTube
almost 7 years ago
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2
87

PHARMACOKINETICS; Absorption & Distribution of Drugs by Professor Fink

In this Video Lecture on Pharmacokinetics, Professor Fink describes the Absorption & Distribution of Drugs. The major factors affecting the systemic absorpti...  
YouTube
almost 7 years ago
12
0
14

Is there any other source of hydrogen ions and lactate production in a cell apart from glycolysis?

Hi all, I was wondering if you know of any other source of hydrogen ions and lactate production in a cell APART from glycolysis? Is it produced by normal cellular processes? According to my understanding, H+ and lactate are produced under hypoxic conditions. Glucose is broken down into lactic acid with then dissociates into lactate and H+. Thanks!  
Gemma Loach
about 9 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 kphjit?1444774023
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4261

Acids and bases as a balancing act to sustain life

This is an excerpt from "Fluids and Electrolytes Made Incredibly Easy! 1st UK Edition" by William N. Scott. For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Fande. Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other LWW titles at lww.co.uk when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out! Introduction The chemical reactions that sustain life depend on a delicate balance – or homeostasis – between acids and bases in the body. Even a slight imbalance can profoundly affect metabolism and essential body functions. Several conditions, such as infection or trauma, and certain medications can affect acid-base balance. However, to understand this balance, you need to understand some basic chemistry. Understanding pH Understanding acids and bases requires an understanding of pH, a calculation based on the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. It may also be defi ned as the amount of acid or base within a solution. Acids consist of molecules that can give up, or donate, hydrogen ions to other molecules. Carbonic acid is an acid that occurs naturally in the body. Bases consist of molecules that can accept hydrogen ions; bicarbonate is one example of a base. A solution that contains more base than acid has fewer hydrogen ions, so it has a higher pH. A solution with a pH above 7 is a base, or alkaline. A solution that contains more acid than base has more hydrogen ions, so it has a lower pH. A solution with a pH below 7 is an acid, or acidotic. Getting your PhD in pH A patient’s acid-base balance can be assessed if the pH of their blood is known. Because arterial blood is usually used to measure pH, this discussion focuses on arterial samples. Arterial blood is normally slightly alkaline, ranging from 7.35 to 7.45. A pH level within that range represents a balance between the concentration of hydrogen ions and bicarbonate ions. The pH of blood is generally maintained in a ratio of 20 parts bicarbonate to 1 part carbonic acid. A pH below 6.8 or above 7.8 is usually fatal. Too low Under certain conditions, the pH of arterial blood may deviate significantly from its normal narrow range. If the blood’s hydrogen ion concentration increases or bicarbonate level decreases, pH may decrease. In either case, a decrease in pH below 7.35 signals acidosis. Too high If the blood’s bicarbonate level increases or hydrogen ion concentration decreases, pH may rise. In either case, an increase in pH above 7.45 signals alkalosis. Regulating acids and bases A person’s well-being depends on their ability to maintain a normal pH. A deviation in pH can compromise essential body processes, including electrolyte balance, activity of critical enzymes, muscle contraction and basic cellular function. The body normally maintains pH within a narrow range by carefully balancing acidic and alkaline elements. When one aspect of that balancing act breaks down, the body can’t maintain a healthy pH as easily, and problems arise.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
over 8 years ago
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148

KETONE BODIES METABOLISM

Metabolism of ketone bodies Gandham.Rajeev Email:gandhamrajeev33@gmail.com  
slideshare.net
over 6 years ago
1d8cc2e8106cba9860c76a626b3330c17b43b7638478426134536035
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1851

Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system

Hope people find this useful.  
Charlie Hall
over 6 years ago
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37

Lipid Metabolism in Normoxic and Ischemic Heart

During recent decades, bewildering progress has occurred in the field of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry. Progress has been extraordinarily rapid primarily because of the challenge for finding solutions to a wide variety of diseases and the availability of new techniques for monitoring biochemical processes. This has resulted in a voluminous and complex literature in the field of biochemical medicine so that there is a clear need for the synthesis and analysis of the continuing expansion of valuable data. It was thus considered appropriate to initiate a new series of monographs, each dedicated to a specialized area of investigation, encompassing molecular and cellular processes in health and disease. Most of the biochemical scientists have devoted their energies in understanding the fundamentals of biochemistry and indeed impressive advances have been made in the past. However, the full potential for explanation has been hampered by the concept of universality of biochemical reactions occurring in the cell. In view of the fact that each organ in the body performs a distinct function, it is now beginning to be realized that each cell type is unique in its need to survive and perform its specific function. Accordingly, the aspect of individualty is receiving increased attention for revealing new avenues in the study of pathophysiology of cellular abnormalities.  
books.google.co.uk
over 6 years ago
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The Digestive System: Functional Anatomy & Physiology of Chemical Digestion and Absorption

A beautifully illustrated walk through the alimentary canal. See the entire gastrointestinal tract on a single page!  
classes.midlandstech.com
over 6 years ago