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EmergencyMedicine

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11
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Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient - Normal Scenario (with possible pathology).wmv

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to perform the initial assessment of a patient with suspected traumatic injury.<br>This scenario is of an uninjured patient. It includes possible pathology to be found at each step.  
Hussam Rostom
over 9 years ago
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11
357

Basic Wound Care - Clinical Skills

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates the principles and techniques underlying...  
youtube.com
over 6 years ago
Af271e7a8a636230497c3296cb7ef4026fa0122b8879623432144044
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510

Summary of Upper Limb Nerve Injuries and their Clinical Presentation

A summary of upper limb nerve injuries of the 5 main nerves (Radial, Median, Ulnar, Axillary and Musculocutaneous). Summarises the mechanism of injury and the likely clinical examination findings. A common topic for exams.  
Sarah Louise Edwards
over 6 years ago
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246

Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient - Pelvic Fracture Scenario.wmv

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to perform the initial assessment of a patient with suspected traumatic injury.<br>This scenario is of a patient with a suspected pelvic fracture and internal haemorrhage.  
Hussam Rostom
over 9 years ago
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10
277

Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

A basic outline of pathophysiology, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and epidemiology.  
Amber Estep
almost 8 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 sql3pi?1444774098
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1011

The NHS needs to learn a lesson from the Military MDT approach

I have recently spent a few days following around registrars on military ward rounds. It has been a fantastic experience for learning about trauma care and rehab, but more importantly it has shown me just how vital team spirit is to modern health care! The military ward round is done once a week. It starts with a huge MDT of almost 40 people, including nurses, physios, registrars and consultants from all of the specialities involved in trauma and rehab. The main trauma ward round team then go to speak to all of the patients in the hospital. The team normally consists of at least one T+O consultant, one plastics, two physios, two nurses, 3 registrars and a few others. This ward round team is huge, unweildly and probably very costly, but those military patients receive a phenomenal level of care that is very quick and efficient. Having then compared this level of care with what I have experience on my 4th year speciality medicine placement, I now feel the NHS has a lot to learn about team work. I am sure that everyone working in healthcare can relate to situations where patients have been admitted under the care of one team, who don’t really know what to do with the patient but struggle on bravely until they are really lost and then look around to see who they can beg for help. The patient then gets ping-ponged around for a few days while management plans are made separately. All of the junior doctors are stressed because they keep having to contact multiple teams to ask what should be done next. The patient is left feeling that their care wasn’t handled very well and is probably less than happy with the delay to their definite treatment. The patient, thankfully, normally ends up getting the correct treatment eventually, but there is often a massive prolongation of their stay in hospital. These prolonged stays are not good for the patient due to increasing risks of complications, side effects, hospital acquired infections etc. They are not good for the health care staff, who get stressed that their patients aren’t receiving the optimum care. The delays are very bad for the NHS managers, who might miss targerts, lose funding and have to juggle beds even more than normal. Finally, it is not good for the NHS as a hole, which has to stump up the very expensive fees these delays cause (approximately £500 a night). There is a simple solution to this which would save a huge amount of time, energy and money. TEAM WORK! Every upper-GI ward round should be done with the consultant surgeon team and a gastroenterologist (even a trainee would probably do) and vice versa, every Gastroenterology ward round should have a surgeon attached. Every orthopaedic ward round should be done with an elderly care physician, physio/rehab specialist and a social worker. Every diabetic foot clinic should have a diabetologist, podiatrist, vascular surgeon and/or orthopaedic surgeon (even trainees). Etc. etc. etc. A more multi-disciplinary team approach will make patient care quicker, more appropriate and less stressful for everyone involved. It would benefit the patients, the staff and the NHS. To begin with it might not seem like an easy situation to arrange. Everyone is over worked, no one has free time, no one has much of a spare budget and everyone has an ego. But... Team work will be essential to improving the NHS. Many MDTs already exist as meetings. MDTs already exist as ED trauma teams, ED resus teams and Military trauma teams. There is no reason why lessons can’t be learnt from these examples and applied to every other field of medicine. I know that as medical students (and probably every other health care student) the theory of how MDTs should work is rammed down our throats time after time, but I personally still think the NHS has a long way to go to live up to the whole team work ethos and that we as the younger, idealist generation of future healthcare professionals should make this one of our key aims for our future careers. When we finally become senior health care professionals we should try our best to make all clinical encounters an MDT approach.  
jacob matthews
over 8 years ago
Gcs
10
707

GCS score?

among all component in GCS (eye, verbal and motor), which is the most important component and why?  
malek ahmad
almost 7 years ago
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10
562

Ultrasound for Appendicitis - emdocs

emDocs post containing very useful emergency medicine information  
emdocs.net
over 6 years ago
3
10
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Manage Burn immediately

It's just how you'll manage a burn patient in Hospital emergency .  
Hasan Mynul Khandoker
almost 6 years ago
Preview 300x246
9
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CXR - left sided pneumothorax and surgical emphysema

In this Chest X-Ray we can identify a left sided pneumothorax - there is absence of lung markings in the periphery and we can also see a shadow which outlines the edge of the lung. A pneumothorax is caused when air enters the potential space between the viceral and parietal pleura and causes the lung to collapse down under the pressure of it's elsatic recoil. In this case it is likely that the pneumothorax has been caused by trauma as we can see air in the soft tissues on the left side (surgical emphysema - clinically feels like bubble wrap). A pneumothorax can be a life threatening condition. The patient presents in respiratory distress with decreased expansion on the affected side. There will be hyperresonance to percussion on that side but absent breath sounds. The emergency treatment is decompression with a large bore cannula in the 2nd intercostal space mid-clavicular line followed by insertion a chest drain in the 5th intercostal space mid-axilllary line  
Rhys Clement
about 12 years ago
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159

Open Fracture

Definition, classification system, initial management and evidence  
Zara Edwards
over 10 years ago
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350

Respiratory Distress & Status asthmaticus in Paediatrics

A detailed presentation about Respiratory Distress & Status asthmaticus in Paediatric patients  
DR. AMY
over 9 years ago
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9
202

Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient - Multi-System Injury (Part 1).wmv

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to perform the initial assessment of a patient with suspected traumatic injury.<br>This video is part 1 of a muti-system injury scenario (airway compromise, tension pneumothorax, bleeding and head injury).  
Hussam Rostom
over 9 years ago
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C-Spine Injury - Collar Application (Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient).wmv

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to size and fit a C-spine collar.<br>It is part of a series of videos on the Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient.  
Hussam Rostom
over 9 years ago
Preview 300x335
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109

Estimating Burn Size

See this in context on [our blog post](https://www.meducation.net/blog_posts/118-Assessing-Types-of-Burns-and-their-Severity). The image is from "Wound Care Made Incredibly Easy! 1st UK Edition" by Julie Vuolo For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/woundcare. Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other LWW titles at http://lww.co.uk when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out!  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
over 8 years ago
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9
709

Sepsis: Diagnosis and Management

Based on surviving sepsis campaign and sepsis kills programme.  
speakerdeck.com
over 6 years ago
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8
214

Shoulder Dislocations

Shoulder Dislocations Ben Savage  
Dr Ben Savage
over 12 years ago
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8
91

Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient - Normal Scenario.wmv

This video - produced by students at Oxford University Medical School in conjunction with the faculty - demonstrates how to perform the initial assessment of a patient with suspected traumatic injury.<br>This scenario is of an uninjured patient.  
Hussam Rostom
over 9 years ago